Failure Is Great

What is failure? What does failure consist of? And is going to failure the correct way to train?

Failure when talking about resistance training is a good thing. It’s one of the very few times in life when failure is perceived as a positive thing.

Going to failure means taking your body to a limit that it cannot possible go on any longer. Not one more repetition of a specific exercise can be performed on a concentric basis. You cannot possible do that movement again. That is failure, that is muscular failure.

Failure will always consist of a lot of work and effort and failure will always be on the basis that you are at your maximum capacity. Failure will always be hard and failure will never be easy. Failure will be physical and not mental. Your mind will be continually pushing but your body will not be able to push through. Failure will feel good, failure will be great, failure will be gratifying.

In the failure that you are causing on that day, the result will be success. The result will be progression. The muscle will grow back stronger. The mind will have taken the workload and be in a far more stable state to take on the task at hand the next time around. Why ? Because you have already conquered that in which you set out to do this time. And what you set out to do was go to failure (again, a rare occurrence at any point in life where you set yourself up for failure).

Going to failure in training is a great way to train. Can you not go to failure and still progress ? Yes. But can you go to failure, step out of your comfort zone and progress even quicker… 100% Yes. Why be afraid of failure when you can push yourself to the limit and benefit from it to no return. These are times where you can really take things to the next level.

No pain no gain ? No pain no profit ?

No failure no progress is more of the stance that is generalised really as the truth.

Failure is good, hit failure, enjoy failure and watch yourself progress from it.

Failure is progress… Only in the weight room through.

Andrew McGee